Street Artist Escif’s Murals in Goa.

THIS warms my heart. Spanish street artist Escif traveled to Goa in an attempt to combat the prevailing negative stigma against street art in India. Escif offered to paint murals of ‘whatever you want’ outside local shops for free.

 

Street artist Escif painting free murals in Goa.

Like this portrait of Mr. Shivadatta. When Mr. Shivadatta passed away his wife Ms. Shivadatta took over his shop. She asked Escif to paint a portrait of her late husband on the facade.

 

Street artist Escif painting free murals in Goa.

Street artist Escif painting free murals in Goa.

The owner of Hotel Cafe Prasao Restaurant asked Escif to paint a big Veghi Talhi on their facade.

 

Street artist Escif painting free murals in Goa.

This space was shared by two women who ran a stamp shop and dental clinic. They asked Escif to paint teeth on the facade to market their dental services a little bit better.

 

Street artist Escif painting free murals in Goa.

The owner of Panjim Garage asked Escif to paint something “well”. But because of Escif’s poor English he understood it as “wheel”.

 

Street artist Escif painting free murals in Goa.

Fatima and her husband recently opened a candelabrum shop, and thus asked Escif to paint a candelabra.

 

Images via www.booooooom.com/

Follow Escif on Instagram here.

Millennial Art by Caroline Goldfarb.

There are certain things I treasure in life. Art and its ancient history would be one of those things. Celebrity culture another. As much as I appreciate baroque art, I truly live and breathe for all things millennial.

 

Let me introduce you to internet sensation Caroline Goldfarb. She admins the viral Instagram account OfficalSeanPenn, and hosts the tv-show This Week Had Me Like. Through these channels she highlights crazy things famous people do. Caroline Goldfarb has built an entire brand on the strange psychology of celebrity.

On top of the aforementioned feats, she also creates collages. And there is nothing not to love about them. Everything from a collage of white people wearing cornrows, to a collage paying homage to the greatness that is Drake’s mother. <3 Caroline Goldfarb’s artistry is in my humble opinion an entertaining commentary on the absurdities of contemporary society, communicated through a very millennial aesthetic. Ugly? Yes. Would I still hang this on my wall? Yes, for sure.

 

caroline goldfarb drake

caroline goldfarb miranda

caroline goldfarb kim kardashian

caroline goldfarb drake's mom

caroline goldfarb justin bieber

caroline goldfarb monica lewinski

caroline goldfarb america

All images are from OfficialSeanPenn on Instagram.

Nike’s Logo + Neoclassical Art = Swoosh Art.

Swoosh Art is the type of art I am here af for. I truly believe masters wanted the Nike logo incorporated into their art when painting their Madonnas and goddesses. They just did’t know it yet. 

 

Swoosh Art is a tumblr page run by award-winning fashion film director Davide Bedoni. In his words Swoosh Art “is what I do when I am bored.”

Placing the so-called Nike ‘swoosh’ in 18th and 19th century masterpieces may seem like a way to emphasise the absurdities of commercialism. But to me this is about creating a connection between visual propaganda of the past with visual propaganda of today. Although these paintings might seem like harmless decorations, they were more often than not commissioned to propagate the message of a social, political or religious conviction.

And besides, who knew that Jacques-Louis David’s iconography would be such an aesthetic match with Carolyn Davidson’s logo-design?

 

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

Tumblr page Swoosh Art, combining old paintings with the Nike logo!

All images are from swooshart.tumblr.com

 

Solange’s Iconic Performance at the Guggenheim Museum.

Growing up as a die hard Destiny’s Child fan, you bet I’ve had my eyes on Solange since the days of her sister Beyonce’s girl group. I distinctly remember staying tuned on MTV just to watch Solange’s music video to Feelin’ You. And listening to I Decided while biking to and from school every day. Although I loved everything Solange did from day one – little did I know she would become one of her generation’s most forward-thinking artists.

 

Of course if you’re reading this you have already watched the music videos to Don’t Touch My Hair and Cranes in the Sky… because otherwise you would be in jail by now. Jail for people I don’t like. Rather than writing about the aforementioned videos, I wish to spotlight Solange’s live performances.

 

In 2016 Solange channeled the message of her album A Seat at the Table through a performance piece titled An Ode To, at the Guggenheim Museum. She requested that the audience come dressed in white, and banned usage of all phones and electronic devices. Hence there being very little documentation of this event.

The message that Solange communicates through her music is clear: it’s all an intelligent commentary on racism, and a celebration of blackness. After the standing ovation, Solange gave a speech regarding her role as a black artist in a predominantly white art world : “inclusion is not enough”. It’s time to enter institutions and tear “the fucking walls down.”

Solange has some of the best curated aesthetics out there. But most importantly – Solange turns the idea of museum exhibitions as we know them, into a safe space for activism through creative expression. 

 

'An Ode To' performance by Solange at the Guggenheim

'An Ode To' performance by Solange at the Guggenheim

'An Ode To' performance by Solange at the Guggenheim

Images above via Solange’s Instagram.

 

"an Ode to " 2017 @guggenheim museum

A post shared by Solange (@saintrecords) on

"an Ode to" 2017 thank you @guggenheim @rbma

A post shared by Solange (@saintrecords) on

 

 

On top of her Guggenheim performance, Solange has also performed at the Pérez Art Museum Miami and the Menil Collection. You can also view an online interactive for the Tate Modern, titled Seventy States here.

 

Since there is no decent footage from any of Solange’s museum performances I thought I’d add a clip from her Jimmy Fallon performance instead. It’s phenomenal.

CONTEMPORARY ART YOU GUYS <3333

Christopher Chiappa’s Installation of 7,000 Fried Egg Miniature Statues in the Kate Werble Gallery.

The term ~ contemporary art ~ is often synonymous to weird art. Just to be clear, ‘contemporary’ just means that the artwork was made fairly recently.
Anyway. Artist Christopher Chiappa‘s installation of 7,000 fried egg miniature statues in the Kate Werble Gallery is definitely just as weird as it is contemporary. Nevertheless… I’m a big fan of fried egg statues.

 

The Kate Werble Gallery describes the exhibition as follows:  “Chiappa’s fried eggs operate squarely within the uncomfortable intersection of two symbolic legacies, mining the darkly humorous vein where perfection and failure meet.”

Haha operate squarely who?!? Uncomfortable intersection whatttt? Darkly humorous vein whom??? This is literally gibberish to me. EITHER WAY. I’M A BIG FAN OF EGG STATUES.

Christopher Chiappa exhibits 7000 fried eggs on gallery walls! #contemporaryart

Christopher Chiappa exhibits 7000 fried eggs on gallery walls! #contemporaryart

Christopher Chiappa exhibits 7000 fried eggs on gallery walls! #contemporaryart

Images via designboom.com

Classical Statues Taking the Subway by Romanian artist Dan Cretu.

Romanian artist Dan Cretu creates photomontages of classical statues in contemporary environments. Like Venus de Milo taking the subway. Or Michelangelo’s David having a nosebleed. <333

 

I am once again obsessed with art that combines the past with the present. So I guess it comes as no surprise that the playful work by Dan Cretu is just my cup of tea.

 

dan cretu artist

dan cretu artist

dan cretu artist

dan cretu artist

dan cretu artist

dan cretu artist

dan cretu artist

dan cretu artist

Images via trendland.

Follow Dan Certu on Instagram here.

3 Inspiring Art Directors You Want to Follow on Instagram!

Today being an artist can mean so many different things. Other than a painter or sculptor you can be a creative director, illustrator, graphic designer or art director – to name a few! In this blog post I will spotlight 3 incredible art directors that I love!

We are living at a time when visual creativity is given a huge platform through social media. Thanks to apps like Instagram, art directors can easily share their creations with the world. I can spend hours upon hours clicking my way through these perfectly curated Instagram accounts. There are just so many of them! And they are all so inspiring! Below I have listed a few of my favourites. Enjoy!

Blanche Yu

Australia and China based Blanche Yu art directs minimal and tasteful pictures for fashion editorials and campaigns. I’m in awe of how her entire life seems to go in one single color scheme. Her Instagram is a combination of casual, aesthetically pleasing observations and photo shoots directed by herself. Follow Blanche Yu on Instagram here.

Sarah Feingold

This German/ Moroccan /Israeli goddess is the founder of nobasicgirlsallowed.com and the art director behind campaigns for Nike and Beats by Dre. Her Instagram is meticulously curated – she always posts three matching photos in a row. Follow Sarah Feingold on Instagram here.

Pau Lart

Pau Lart is an art director and artist from Barcelona. She explains her aesthetic as “freedom, order, colour, feminism, painting, art, passion”. You can follow her personal Instagram account here. However, she is more known for curating the content for the Instagram account Hello Artists.

All images are from Instagram.

French Artist Alexandre Ciancio Creates Nostalgic Collages.

French artist Alexandre Ciancio creates nostalgic collages of black-and-white figures on pastel backgrounds and I am very here for it.

Despite Alexandre Ciancio initially being an architect, there are no signs of buildings or infrastructure in his art. Instead, the only sense of spatiality and depth is provided by the subjects and how they interact with each other. Subtracting these black-and-white figures from their context and placing them in a dreamy, pastel world makes them feel more like vintage paper dolls than actual human beings. I guess you could say that Alexandre Ciancio has taken our past and turned up its aesthetics… And I am not one to complain.

artist-alexandre-ciancio artist-alexandre-ciancioartist-alexandre-ciancio

artist-alexandre-ciancio

All images are from http://ciancio-alexandre.tumblr.com/

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums.

The great thing about photography is that it can show you places you might otherwise never see. Remote towns in post-Soviet countries such as Ukraine and Uzbekistan would for instance qualify for that list. In 2014 Maryam Omidi visited a sanatorium in the mountains of Tajikistan and was blown away by the experience. She contacted a group of photographers specialising in capturing post-Soviet culture and together they set off to visit as many sanatoriums as their budget (raised on Kickstarter) would allow.

USSR sanatoriums were built as a place of relaxation and rehabilitation so that workers could remain efficient and diligent. At their peak they were visited by millions of citizens across the USSR every year through a state-funded voucher system. Dozens of them are still in business. 

The book Holidays in Soviet Sanatariums published by Fuel describes these incredible facilities as “a combination of medical institution and spa, the era’s sanatoriums are among the most innovative buildings of their time.” I personally love the plump, brutalist aesthetics of most USSR architecture, especially if it entails weird indoor swimming pools. Say what you will about Stalin, but you can’t deny that he had a keen eye for some pretty poppin’ aesthetics. 

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Holidays in Soviet Sanatoriums

Images via Fuel Design and The Telegraph.

Ukranian Artist Alexey Kondakov’s Classical Subjects in Contemporary Life.

When I first found Ukranian artist Alexey Kondakov’s art on Pinterest a couple years back I went crazy realising that there were no articles written on him at all. Who was this guy photoshopping classical art subjects into contemporary environments?

Now Alexey Kondakov is a lot more recognised and I just love his ongoing series ‘Art history in contemporary life’ and ‘The daily life of gods’. Scenes we usually only see in history books or museums are now taking place on the subway! It obviously doesn’t take a lot to blow my mind – blurring the lines between academic art and postmodernism basically gets you there.

All photos are from Alexey Kondakov’s Instagram or Facebook